Tag: series

“Sharpe’s Honor” by Bernard Cornwell Review

Sharpe's Honor

Sharpe’s Honor: Book Sixteen of the Richard Sharpe Series

Richard Sharpe and the Vitoria Campaign, February to June 1813

Author:  Bernard Cornwell

Published:  1985

Coming off my favorite installment to date in the excellent Sharpe’s Enemy, any book that followed was bound to feel like a let down. That was certainly the case with Sharpe’s Honor, the sixteenth chronological book in the Richard Sharpe series, but overall this was still a book I enjoyed. I think the worst aspects of this book came from a new theory I have that Bernard Cornwell comes up with clever words to attach to Sharpe’s name for book titles, and then writes the book trying to shoehorn as many allusions to that word as possible throughout the book.

Taking place in the closing months of the Spanish conflict between Britain and France during the Napoleonic Wars, Major Richard Sharpe is the target of a plot by the French intelligence officer Pierre Ducos. The Whore of Gold, Richard’s object of lust from prior books, Helene is the mechanism for the plot who sets everything in motion by sending a letter to her husband accusing Sharpe of making a drunken attempt at raping her. Helene’s husband then challenges Richard Sharpe’s, ahem, honor by challenging Sharpe to a duel. When Helene’s husband ends up dying, Sharpe ends up exiled on a secret mission that involves deadly Spanish partisans, breaking into a nunnery, prison escapes and wagons full of riches beyond imagination.

With any book series that are this lengthy, I appreciate when there is a deviation from one book to another that is memorable or changes the series. While Sharpe’s Honor lacks the major character deaths or military promotions of other books, it does affect the overall series in three manners. **Slight Spoilers Follow** First, Patrick Harper ends up married and has a baby on the way. Unlike Sharpe’s earlier marriage, it seems at least possible that these characters will travel with the army beyond this book. Second, Sharpe loses his longest tenured possession, one that connects him to the most powerful man in his world, but gets it replaced with something much more extravagant. **End of Spoilers** Finally and most importantly, this book ends the Spanish conflict and it looks like French soil is on the horizon. The Sharpe books thus far have spent extensive time in India, before hopping around to places like Denmark and Portugal, but it feels like we’ve been in Spain the longest and the change of scenery should help add some excitement in the next chapter.

The best scene in this book is probably Sharpe’s excursion into a Spanish nunnery. While the prison scene featured some of the most violent and destructive descriptions to be found in a Sharpe book, the mysterious solution provided for Sharpe felt far too convenient in the timing of and execution of it all to really register as believable. The nunnery relied instead on a quick decision by Sharpe to shift the blame away from himself that was both very funny and very clever. Since Sharpe is basically a superhero at this point, anything that shifts the story away from him outfighting his opponent stands out by comparison.

Besides the less than thrilling prison escape (which again, was preceded by an amazingly brutal action sequence), this book also loses some points by relying on three villains that all pale when compared to either of the two villains from the previous book. Pierre Ducos seems to be Sharpe’s long term villain at this point, which is unfortunate as the best Sharpe villains have been those that try to best him at his own game on the battlefield. Ducos is closer to Father Hacha (the Inquisitor) and El Matarife (the sadist Spanish partisan), the villains that Sharpe must overcome in this book, as all three have no real loyalty or qualms about killing innocents to stop Sharpe. While I’m still loving this series, and even enjoyed Sharpe’s Honor, I’ve got it ranked as the 9th best in the first 17, which puts it in the bottom half in terms of quality

4-star

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“Night Terrors” by Alice Henderson Review

Night Terrors

Night Terrors (A Stake Your Destiny Buffy Book)

Author: Alice Henderson

Published:  2005

Maybe I’m biased because I made it through this book to a happy ending on my first try, but this was my favorite of the Stake Your Destiny Buffy books. I wrote in my review forKeep Me In Mind that “the entire thing reads like a long dream sequence (I hate dream sequences).” Night Terrorsactually featured a lengthy dream sequence so now I’m reevaluating my stance on the topic. I think the problem with Keep Me In Mind was that the entire book felt like a training drill with zero stakes (sorry, bad pun… how about consequences) for the reader. In Night Terrors I was making what I felt was the best choice each time but I constantly felt like I was leading Buffy to her death as the plot got weirder and wackier.

The plot of Night Terrors is that people around Sunnydale are getting sleepy, and feeling paralyzed in their sleep but feeling as though they are awake. It starts off affecting Buffy but spreads to others like Angel and her classmates. As Buffy feels like something is sitting on top of her, and that she’s not alone in her room, she lies paralyzed and unable to do anything about it. Once the feeling has passed, we’re given the choice of going to find Angel, going out on a patrol, or studying for a test that day that we’ve so far neglected. The choice is simple enough, but right away the book at least gave options that felt either more authentic to how Buffy would behave in the tv series or that an average reader would consider in her place (the previous Stake Your Destiny books have seemed addicted to offering a day spent with Cordelia right out of the gate).

**Slight Spoilers follow**

I flipped around when I was finished and saw other happy endings possible for the reader, and since it’s difficult to review this book without giving away the track I followed, reader beware. I started off patrolling before ending up heading toward the gym at Principal Snyder’s direction. Before I got there I decided to check on a crying student. After I learned more from the Scoobies, I decided to sleep and confront the Night Terror right away (my thinking being that staying up would just lead to a later confrontation with a tired and weakened slayer). After entering the dream world, I tried to locate Willow to communicate with the other spirits. When that was a dead end, I decided to Trust Ned, the man from Planet X who worked with the Lava people and build a dreamcatcher to catch the Night Terror.

For those following along, yeah that took a turn well away from anything in the series. I can only say that the alternative options presented to me seemed like tricks by the enemy, and that my path resulted in a happy ending. Spending about one third of this story in an anything goes dream world actually felt more like an episode of the tv series than one would thing just from reading that recap. In particular, it felt like the season four finale where Willow, Buffy, and Xander are encountering the First Slayer in their sleep.

**End of spoilers**

Besides feeling like a fun episode of the series and rewarding my obviously excellent choices based on years of watching the show and reading the books and comics, Night Terrorsalso benefitted by not having the ultra predictable page numbering problem present in some of the other Stake Your Destiny books. I jumped into the last 200 pages fairly early and often my two choices were close enough in page numbering to not give away which way the book was steering me. Although I wouldn’t put this book up there withDune or East of Eden, I’ve now read all of the Stake Your Destiny books and this was the only one that I didn’t come away from with grievances, and I actually had a really fun time reading it. That earns a perfect score from this reader.

3-star

“Quasar” #46-60 by Mark Gruenwald and Ron Marz

Quasar 60

Quasar #46-60 by Marvel Comics

Writers – Mark Gruenwald, Ron Marz

Artists – Andy Smith, Grant Miehm, John Heebrink

Published 1993-1994

**Note, this review is for Quasar issues #46-60**

The final 15 issues of Quasar felt like an encapsulation of the things that made this an entertaining as well as frustrating series. Once again, Quasar gets pulled into a crossover that, reading this series on its own, leaves the reader with little understanding of the story line and even less invested in the outcome. Along with Andy Smith and Grant Miehm, John Heebink comes on board as artist for several issues and provided competent though certainly not flashy work. As the series wrapped up, each of the recurring characters got to complete their character arc: Makkori learned that being fast isn’t everything in life, Kismet found a purpose besides reproducing with Quasar, and Kayla…. well, let’s talk about Kayla.

I mentioned in my earlier reviews that the most enjoyable part of this series for me was Quasar’s development of a relationship with Kayla. Her character took a superhero twist at the end of the last batch of issues, which I didn’t particularly care for, but it ended up being the core conflict throughout these last 15. By my count, there was only one issue throughout this series of 60 comics that featured Quasar and Kayla on a full issue adventure together, and probably only 2 dates shown that the characters go out on. That’s pretty slim to hang the weight of a superhero story conflict on, and I think Gruenwald missed an opportunity to make the readers more invested in the characters and the relationship by never letting it appear on the page. (I say Gruenwald as he wrote 59 of the sixty issues, this last group of issues also features a standalone story by Ron Marz that was quite fun but is completely out of place with when it is taking place in the larger story arc.)

Still the payoff to the Quasar/Kayla arc ended up being one of the best issues in the entire series. Overall, I’d say because of the buildup to it, issue #58 was my favorite issue of the series, but because it required reading a lot of so-so comics to get there, the first three issues (#1-3) would be better reads as stand alone stories. As a Marvel Cosmic character, I’d agree that Quasar belongs in a lower tier than characters like Silver Surfer, Adam Warlock or Nova in terms of quality of stories and iconic appearances. His replacement with a female version in the Abnett and Lanning cosmic era was a good idea that has also not been capitalized on. Quasar may be destined to be a character that never becomes recognizable outside of fans of 1990’s comics, but I can’t exactly argue that it’s undeserved.

3-star

“Meg: Nightstalkers” by Steve Alten

Meg nightstalkers

Meg: Nightstalkers

Author:  Steve Alten

Published:  2016

Meg Series #5

Five books into the Meg series (and apparently one should also have read The Loch by now as well), this was the first book in the series that I found myself shaking my head at the ridiculous plot more than enjoying it. That’s quite a statement, as the book has previously featured the discovery of giant extinct sharks, a character named Jonas being swallowed by a sea creature and surviving (yeah, it’s not Jonah but it’s close enough) and a prehistoric dinosaur called a Liopleurodon that Alten makes 100 feet larger than a reputable website like Wikipedia claims was possible.

**Slight spoilers follow** Set shortly after the events of Meg: Hell’s Aquarium, this book follows dual plot lines as both Jonas and David Taylor are involved in tracking down giant sea creatures that were formerly isolated from the rest of the oceans. While David is tracking down the Liopleurodon that ate a loved one earlier in the series, Jonas is trying to figure out what to do with his Lagoon now that the Megs housed within have been set free. Sounds like a logical followup to the earlier books… so why didn’t this installment, err, keep its head above water for me?

1. The shoehorned crossover with The Loch and its upcoming sequel Volstok felt very out of place with the rest of the series. The plot is inherently ridiculous, so slapping a time travel element in it just seems to break the anything goes rules one step too far. Also, the method of explaining all of this was done over about 5 pages in the book and didn’t seem like it was necessary to maneuver the plot where Alten wanted to take it.

2. The over dependence on the Liopleurodon for the plot. Alten has all of these cool sea creatures he could write about, so why spend so much time on an animal that didn’t even exist as Alten has written it. At this point it might as well be a dragon or something else mythological for as far off as it is from what we know about the actual creature.

3. In contrast, the Moby Dick whale was a very cool addition to the creature catalog, but the explanation for how and why it was just now being discovered tied into the stupid Volstok storyline, which in turn distracted from the enjoyment of reading about a super huge and aggressive whale.

4. Most importantly, there was a significant lack of something in this book, and that something is giant prehistoric sharks called Megalodons. I’m not a Harry Potter scholar, but I’d imagine this is similar to reading that series for four books and then in the fifth book Harry shows up for a few pages while the rest of the gang takes a trip to Mordor. Jonas, David and Terry Taylor may be the protagonists of these books, but they’re still just plot points necessary to tell a story about giant sharks.

I’ll keep reading the Meg series because there’s only one more solicited and they’re quick reads. More than that, when Alten focuses on an exciting shark story he’s capable of making a funny and exciting story that reads like a blockbuster film (for me, Meg: Primal Waters is a perfect example of that). I’ll keep an eye out for the tie in books as well, as maybe getting that storyline fleshed out more than its done here will add in the enjoyment for Meg: Generations, currently solicited for 2018.

2-star

“Colony” by Melinda Metz and Laura J. Burns Review

Colony

Author: Melinda Metz and Laura J. Burns

Release Date: 2005

Colony

The first season of Buffy features some ridiculous storylines and villains, including an episode (“Teacher’s Pet”) where Xander’s teacher is a beautiful woman who is actually a praying mantis looking to eat her mates.  Colony takes place during season two of Buffy and features a very similar villain although with the added danger of mind control (similar to the episode “Bad Eggs”).  With a plot reminiscent of two actual episodes, one would expect that this book nails the overall feel of the early episodes of the season.  There were a few issues that keep that from being the case, starting with that recurring Buffy novelization problem of visions by the protagonist.  One gets the feeling that a lot of these writers rewatched the movie before writing their books as Buffy’s dreams are constantly referenced in the books whereas they were totally disregarded in the show.  The other biggest problem in this book was Buffy’s slow reaction to the danger her friends were in.

In Colony, the school is visited by a guest speaker who is actually an Ant Queen whose goal is to reproduce and build an Ant Colony.  Buffy sees many of her friends and Watcher under mind control, and even suffering from body horror out of Cronenberg (Xander develops a giant thorax, other characters develop Ant mouths) but routinely takes no action or doesn’t acknowledge the seriousness of the situation.  It’s difficult to criticize a book with a ridiculous plot (and a giant demon that resembles the Lucky Charms Leprechaun) for not taking things seriously enough, but the characters treating the situation as not serious removed any tension from this book.

This is a Stake Your Destiny book where the reader makes choices and tries to navigate through to a happy ending.  In that regard this book did a better job that either of the previous two installments (although I preferred the story more in The Suicide King).  The choices offered to the character were more in line with actual paths Buffy might take in the show, and I made it through with only one wrong choice.  My one wrong choice involved whether Buffy should ask Xander about what was going on with him or go patrolling and look for Angel.  It was one of those situations where Buffy made a few other decisions after the one I made which ended up killing her but overall it didn’t feel completely unfair.  This book also didn’t have the same problem as Keep Me in Mind where the choices were obvious based on page numberings which one you should pick.  Here I jumped back and forth across the book and reached the end so if there was a more direct path through it I missed out on it.

The cleverest part of this book involved the purpose of the personality test that the students were all required to take (determining what role they’d have in the ant colony).  The twist felt like a well thought out reason for the villain assuming the identity that she was posing under.  I still have another Stake Your Destiny to go and am hoping for one that feels accurate to the series and offers realistic choices laid out in a non-predictable manner.  So far each of these books has been lacking in at least one of those areas, but I am still enjoying the general idea of reading these and navigating my own way through a Buffy episode.

3-star

Rank the Series: John Updike’s Rabbit Angstrom Books

John Updike’s Rabbit series is unusual in the literary world for several reasons.  For starters, it’s a series of books that doesn’t involve any supernatural, magical or militaristic elements.  It’s also very adult material, with probably as much time spent on sexual acts as anything I’ve read (including the awful “50 Shades of Grey”) but described more realistically than you would find in an erotica novel.  Most impressively, the series was written over 41 years and takes place in real time with the characters and current events aging with the author (and readers who originally picked up the series).  The series is to literature what “Savage Dragon” is to comic books or “Boyhood” is to film, an achievement and testament to its creator merely for existing.

 The idea of this series, following the life and death of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom as detailed over generations, was so interesting to me that the quality of the books almost became secondary.  Having now finished the series, I’m glad I read it all chronologically as each of the five installments was essential in understanding who the characters were and why they reacted to situations as they did.  If you are planning on reading this series, there’s no other order you should read it in than “Rabbit, Run” –>  “Rabbit Redux” –> “Rabbit is Rich” –> “Rabbit at Rest” –> “Rabbit Remembered.”  But that’s not very fun to write about, so here are some thoughts on how enjoyable each of the books in the series is, ranked from worst to best:

 Rabbit redux

5.  Rabbit Redux

Release date:  1971

Chronological Order:  Second

 The two easiest choices in ranking this series are best and worst.  I enjoyed every Rabbit book except for this one that takes all of the social strife of its era and tells the ugliest story in the entire series.  Even in later books the events of “Rabbit Redux” are spoken of in disbelief, with plenty of “do you believe the time Harry had that teen girl and her drug dealer move in with him and then _____ happened?”  In addition to general unpleasantness of the story, the book is also bogged down with racial language of the era that will make many readers uncomfortable. I almost quit reading the series after this one, but after finishing the next three books my dislike for this book is tempered as it became just another crazy memory in the lives of its characters.

 rabbit remembered

4.  Rabbit Remembered

Release Date: 2001

Chronological Order:  Fifth

 This novella is shorter than the rest of the series and also is missing a major focal point from the rest of the series.  Despite that, Updike tells a compelling story about Rabbit’s two surviving children and the people they have grown up to become.  The real world politics and current events that make it into every story resonated the most for me of any book in the series as they were the headlines and pop culture of my youth.  The biggest drawback however is that any ending to this story pales in comparison to the excellent and fitting conclusion to “Rabbit at Rest” in terms of wrapping up the series.

 rabbit

3.  Rabbit is Rich

Release Date:  1981

Chronological Order:  Third

 “Rabbit is Rich” and the second place book on this list are interchangeable in terms of quality.  Here Updike has abandoned the extreme events of “Rabbit Redux” in favor of a much more toned down and relatable storyline.  As Rabbit has finally settled down and reduced the drama in his work and personal life, his son Nelson is now old enough to supply drama enough for both of them.  The ending of this book gets into the most over the top sexual situations in the entire series, so if that’s something that turns you off at the end keep in mind it’s all toned back down after this book.

 Rabbit Run

2.  Rabbit, Run

Release Date: 1960

Chronological Order: First

 A young married man decides to abandon his pregnant wife and young child in favor of the thrill of escape.  I’ll give this book the edge over “Rabbit is Rich” for being the book that established this entire fictional family tree, business and household that have survived so well throughout the series.  Just about everything that happens in the rest of the Rabbit series can be traced to an event in this first book.  At parts heartbreaking and other moments infuriating, Updike does a great job of making unlikable characters interesting and sympathetic.

 rab

1.  Rabbit at Rest

Release Date: 1990

Chronological Order:  Fourth

 The only book in the series I would call a classic on its own, “Rabbit at Rest” is the rare book that delights on every page and even makes you reevaluate earlier books in a more favorable light.  Now a grandparent, Harry’s bad behavior swings more toward curmudgeon and for the first time in the series is even a likable character at times.  However, Harry is also still the same man he’s always been and behaves true to form when given the opportunity.  The family drama provides the most interesting moments in thirty years of history for Harry, Janice and Nelson.  I also can’t speak highly enough about the ending, which provides nostalgia and cyclical storytelling better than just about anything I’ve read.  I loved this book for how it made me reevaluate and love the entire series.

Rank the Series: The Sword of Truth by Terry Goodkind

When I first started the Sword of Truth series, I loved it.  I hadn’t read a lot of fantasy, and as a result I was surprised at the mixture of likable characters and adult drama that filled the pages.  So I continued to read, and Goodkind continued to write, and write and write.  As a completionist, I stuck with them, even though the stories became more and more predictable and repetitive.  For this being a twelve book series (as of this writing), not a lot happened in the later books.  I have spent countless hours reading these massive books, and I can say that not all of those hours have been rewarding.  If I could go back in time and talk to my younger self about my reading habits, the advice I’d give him would be “The Sword of Truth series will disappoint you, more than half of the books are not good and the payoff is only average. Then, when you think you’re finished, he’ll release another book that’s really bad.  If you insist on reading this series, just read the good ones and read recaps of the bad ones.”  I’m sure I wouldn’t have followed my own advice (I’m like Joseph Gordon-Levitt in “Looper” that way), but here’s my breakdown of the books in this series and where the reader should drop off in favor of a recap:

 Wizards_first_rule

1.       Wizard’s First rule –A solid introduction to this world and its characters, one that has unfortunately been damaged by the end of the series.  While Richard and Zedd are faily prototypical heroes of Fantasy, Kahlan’s role as a confessor was unique enough to give make this a plunge worth taking.  After reading “Confessor,” you will realize a lot of what the characters believe in this series are lies and the drama of this book was mostly unnecessary.  But you won’t realize that yet, so I say go ahead and read this one if you’re interested in this series. Overall rank – 3rd out of 12.

       READ IT

Stone_of_Tears

2.      Stone of Tears – More than any other book in the series, Stone of Tears expands the world of the Sword of Truth series and leaves the reader optimistic about the scope of amazing stories Goodkind will surely share with his readers.  The Sisters of the Light and the expansion to Aydindril provided enough change from the previous book to distract from the normal problems that were starting to pop up in the writing. Because it was early in the series, there was less prior material to recap as well.  Overall rank – 2nd out of 12

       READ IT

blood of the fold

3.      Blood of the Fold – At this point in the series, I still enjoyed this book but also realized that Goodkind was fairly limited as a writer. Tons of time is spend recapping prior events and lengthy speeches by characters become more frequent.  Goodkind also spends a great deal of time describing acts of violence against women, more so than in the rest of this series (which still deals with this quite a bit).  Even if the scenes don’t bother you, you’ll realize quickly how often Goodkind uses this as a crutch for generating tension in his plot.  Overall rank – 4thout of 12

       READ IT

Temple_of_the_Winds

4.      Temple of the  Winds – The Hallmarks of what ruins most of this series begin here and are on full display.  The villains are all sadistic clones of each other, prophecy comes up out of nowhere that foreshadows the end of everything and isn’t mentioned again before or after this book, the magic used at the end and reveal of the Temple of the Winds are deus ex machina that completely ignore the rules of magic set out in other books.  Also, the way that Kahlan “betrays” Richard in blood was about as close for me to throwing a book in the garbage as I got in this series.  Overall rank – 6 out of 12 (Yes, that means many of these books are really bad).

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Soul_of_the_Fire

5.      Soul of the Fire – A lot of the same problems as the last book, but this book sets the new tone for the series that every book will follow, namely that no character in the book knows anything about magic.  Wizards and the like such as Zedd, Nicci, the Prelates, Nathan etc. will argue with Richard about what magic can and can’t do.  **Spoiler alert for the series**  Richard is always right, in every book, every time. Despite that, these same experts (his teachers) will doubt him through every book.  Finally Richard will solve the problem through some amazing magic at the end that comes out of nowhere, then be treated as an amateur again at the next book and also forget how to use magic yet again until the ending.  Overall rank – 7 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Faith_of_the_Fallen

6.      Faith of the Fallen – The last good book in the series, and my favorite entry overall.  Look, it’s Goodkind, so it’s not perfect.  This is the preachiest book in the entire series, but the story and characters were all at their most enjoyable.  Throughout the Sword of Truth, with almost zero exceptions the characters are archetypes that don’t change or do anything unpredictable.  In this book, Nicci has an actual character arc and grows as a person.  I’d describe this as Goodkind doing a good Ayn Rand impersonation, so it’s definitely not for everybody but it was well done.  Overall rank – 1 out of 12.

       READ IT

Pillars_of_Creation

7.      The Pillars of Creation – The most forgettable installment in the entire series, that’s actually sort of a compliment at this point.  There was nothing about this one that completely infuriated me, but there were also still tons of pages of recaps and character speeches that did nothing to advance the plot.  This is an entry that could have been skipped altogether and not affected the series.  Overall rank – 9 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, RECAP OPTIONAL

Naked_Empire

8.      Naked Empire – This is a bad book.  I’ll summarize by saying the problems that were in Temple of the Winds, Soul of the Fire and Faith of the Fallen are proudly resurrected for this novel.  What I could do, is recap what all of those problems are and spend ½ of a book talking about those problems and how they were addressed previously instead of actually writing a new story, and fill the other half with definitive statements on how we should view the world and what makes a person good (this style of writing could be called “Goodkinding”) but that wouldn’t be very entertaining, would it?  Overall rank – 10 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Chainfire

9.      Chainfire – The beginning of the END.  Book one of a trilogy to wrap up this meandering series that lost all quality 2 books ago. Surely, stuff starts to happen that is important in this book, and the long recaps are abbreviated?  WRONG.  All of the same problems here, including new magic rules that nobody knows and are quickly broken, more dark prophecy out of nowhere.  Here’s your recap: Richard and Kahlan are separated.  Overall rank 11 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Phantom_SoT

10.  Phantom – We’re getting closer to the end, but still nothing much happens.  This book had probably the least interesting plot of any in this series.  Kahlan and Richard are still separated, but now there’s a blood-beast to contend with.  (A blood-beast is another magic thing that came out of nowhere, that nobody has ever heard of, and is tied into new prophecy).  I’ll rank it higher than “Pillars of creation,” “Naked Empire” or “Chainfire” because the stupid blood-beast was more action than any of the entirety of those go nowhere books.  Overall rank 8 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Confessor

11.  Confessor – The best book since Faith of the Fallen (settle down, the other four books were all… not good).  There’s still tons of recap and preaching, but actual things happen in this book!  There’s an exciting Ja’la match, a trip to the underworld, and the final use of magic rules that come out of nowhere and prophecy that doesn’t make sense (because the series ended!).  The end of the book conveniently tries to fix everything, and really there aren’t many consequences for any characters of interest in this book.  Cara and maybe Zedd have endings that wrap up their story, but the rest of the characters are pretty much where they’ve been since book three in the series.  Overall rank, 5 out of 12.

       READ IT

OmenMachineCover

12.  The Omen Machine – Wait, there’s another book after Confessor?  I’ll start by saying this was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Like Scarlet Witch in Marvel Comics, I had to say outloud when finishing this book “No more Goodkind.”  For starters, early Goodkind was well written even when his poor plots and overly preachiness took over.  The Omen Machine was not even well written.  Much of the fun banter is missing, also gone is the feeling of any gravity to a situation.  Despite being a shorter book it was harder to get through than any other in the series.  The big wrap up that Confessor finally delivered?  The Omen Machine takes place ONE DAY later and goes right back to the same well with a new prophecy that threatens all.  Kahlan in particular is useless in this novel, ignoring all of her prior resourcefulness from the series and requiring Richard to do everything.  This series had a few books I’ll remember fondly, but this last book was so bad and it caps off a string of subpar books that Goodkind’s not getting any more of my time or money.  12 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, DON’T READ A RECAP, PRETEND IT DOESN’T EXIST

 Overall Rankings from Best to Worst:

1.      Faith of the Fallen #6

2.      Stone of Tears #2

3.      Wizard’s First Rule #1

4.      Blood of the Fold #3

5.      Confessor #11

6.      Temple of the Winds #4

7.      Soul of the Fire #5

8.      Phantom #10

9.      The Pillars of Creation #7

10.  Naked Empire #8

11.  Chainfire #9

12.  The Omen Machine #12

 **Note – I read these books before I started reviewing each book I read.  My thanks to the many reviewers who have reviewed the individual books in the series for their assistance in reminding me which order to put the bad books in.**