Tag: ranked

“Reborn” by F. Paul Wilson Review

Reborn

Reborn

Author:  F. Paul Wilson

Published:  1990

The Adversary Cycle:  Book Four by Publication, Book Two Chronologically

For those into how books fit into larger overall universes,Reborn is the fourth book in F. Paul Wilson’s the adversary cycle, but the second book chronologically, which means it takes place after The Keep but before the entire Repairman Jack series and somewhere during the Secret History line of books (this takes place in the 1960’s if that helps). Throughout this whole series of books Wilson has done his version of ghost stories, science fiction, and even vampires. Here is Wilson’s Rosemary’s Baby story, so much so that the characters even mention it on a few different occasions.

The story goes that a married couple discover that a wealthy man who has just died may be the secret father of the husband. This revelation leads them to search through his journals for the identity of the man’s mother and any other information they can find to give him answers about his parents. Along the way there are connections to secret World War II science experiments, a possible vigilante with a crow bar, and an order of religious individuals dedicated to stopping the anti-Christ. There is also an appearance from at least one character from the first Adversary Cycle bookThe Keep .

Mentioning Rosemary’s Baby and the anti-Christ crusaders will give you a pretty good idea of how the plot of this book progresses, but it’s impossible to discuss without getting into that facet. I admire Wilson for attempting to tell an interesting story about the return of a formidable villain in his world, but the nature of the plot feels derivative to that iconic work. The greater problem however is that the entire book is populated by people making horrible decisions.

The two main characters are meant to be sympathetic, but both of them willingly turn a blind eye to horrific acts willingly. Similarly, the heroic character provided by Wilson in the form of a Jesuit Priest always remains reactive to the plot (the most heroic thing he does in the entire book is not have sex with a woman who wants him to). The series’ recurring heroic character does nothing in this book to influence the tragic turn of events.

Even within the logic of the book, it’s difficult to figure out what you (the reader) want to have happen. There is a force that benefits when people suffer or cause emotional harm. Does that mean that the sex between two consenting adults will be good or bad for that force (the book decides that action will aid the evil force). Or if a woman tries to perform an unwanted abortion on a trusting relative (here the book says that will harm the evil force). The result for me was a rather unpleasant reading experience where I knew a bad outcome was going to happen the entire time and every choice along the way is just drawing out the inevitable tragedy.

So far the Adversary Cycle has suffered compared to the Repairman Jack Series as it has lacked the moral center of Jack (a man whose own particular morals are certainly not in line with the general public). I’m still planning on reading the two remaining books before I finish up both series withNightworld but my hopes for finding another great series of books is slowly dwindling.

2-star

“The Talisman” by Stephen King and Peter Straub Review

The talisman

The Talisman

Authors:  Stephen King & Peter Straub

Published:  1984

A boy must travel to another world that exists parallel to our own to find a magical talisman in order to save his mother. Not the plot one would expect from a Stephen King book, even one that he coauthored. Here the other world is a place called the Territories, sharing more in common with a fantasy land than the America Jack (the protagonist) is used to. Jack begins the book in the New Hampshire (hey, we’re at least a few hours from Maine) and must get to California. In order to get there he’ll travel both in the real world and in the territories, sometimes on his own, and at other times accompanied by Wolf (a werewolf) or Richard Sloat (the son of the man trying to stop him). There’s a man trying to stop him? One could guess by the description that he’s an evil doer, trying to rule the world and **spoiler alert for anybody whose never read a fantasy book before, I guess** only the Talisman can stop him.

The book I was most reminded of when reading this was Haroun and the Sea of Stories. The two books have nothing in common except for why they didn’t work for me. In both books the author sets out to tell a child’s story but did so in a way that a child would not understand or be appropriate for. Instead of veering toward young adult, this book was firmly in the adult content genre. I’m an adult so that should have been fine, but it was also saddled with this boring and formulaic story straight out of a kid’s book. I enjoy kids books, but at nearly 700 pages the “will Jack find the Talisman?” story became downright tedious.

The villains in this book were over the top cliches, even in the annals of Stephen King bullies. Until the two sidekicks are provided to Jack the book has zero stakes because the length and subject matter guarantee Jack will keep advancing to California. The most interesting aspect of the book is the reciprocity between the events in the Territories and those in the real world. This is alluded to at one point for being the cause of World War I. After the cataclysmic ending of this book, I was looking forward to seeing how all of the casualties in the Territories would affect America; unfortunately King and Straub gloss over this beside mentioning emergency personnel being needed to respond to the area of the final confrontation.

This book has a pretty high average score on Goodreads, so I’m sure a lot of people enjoy something about it. I found the plot to be very generic of the fantasy genre, and the main characters (Jack and Morgan) particularly unoriginal. The book also presents the most unoriginal version of the magical Negro character that King has yet rolled out, and considering the regularity of the character archetype’s appearance (The Shining, The Stand, The Green Mile) that’s saying something. The only character I found at all interesting in this was Richard Sloat, and that was mostly because I was wondering if he would turn on Jack or not. Even the resolution to his story provided little conflict on whether to side with Jack or his dad. I guess there’s a sequel to this book that takes place much later, hopefully it’s an improvement on The Talisman.

2-star

Rank the Author: Bret Easton Ellis

Making his debut at age 21 with the dark and twisted “Less Than Zero,” Bret Easton Ellis is one of the few authors to achieve both celebrity level fame and vitriol in equal levels throughout his career.  For many, his stories are written simply to shock and titillate from a misogynistic viewpoint.  For others he is the master of populating the page with terrible human beings that draw the reader into their sordid affairs.  As part of the literary brat pack (with Tama Janowitz and Jay McInerney), Ellis is also often linked to Generation Xers and his more contemporary works have suffered comparatively by most critical measures.

 When deciding how to read Ellis’s bibliography, part of the fun is in the use of shared characters and settings mainly by reference.  Much like Stephen King and his small towns in Maine, characters in Ellis’s work often know about events from other books or interact with characters from Ellis’s (and even other authors) earlier novels.  For that reason, a fun way to read his works is chronological order, starting with Less than Zero, The Rules of Attraction, American Psycho, Glamorama, and Imperial Bedrooms.  The Informers and Lunar Park don’t take place in the same reality as those books, so if you are going this route I would read The Informers first and end things with Lunar Park.  If you are not interested in diving into the entirety of Ellis’s catalog, here’s how I would rank his books overall, from worst to best:

 Glamorama

7.  Glamorama

Release Date: 1998

 I would describe the plot of this book as Zoolander in the style of Guy Ritchie.  Models being used as killers with numerous identity deceptions and possible double identities… even trying to recall the plot is a recipe for a headache.  The biggest problems with the book are that the beginning takes a long time to get to the plot of the book, that plot is completely outlandish, and then Ellis never seems to be willing to wrap it up.  Even hardcore fans of the author seem to agree that at 500 pages the story meanders.  Recurring metaphors don’t really work either as they are drowned out by lengthy descriptions of drug use and ménage a trios.  My only enjoyment in reading it was the numerous ties it had to other Ellis works, none of which were worth the time spent getting through this disappointing book.

the informers

6 . The Informers

Release Date: 1994

 The only other book by Brett Easton Ellis that I would describe as skippable, even for fans of his writing style.  The Informers is a collection of short stories that are seemingly unconnected (though not totally) that often withholds the name of the narrator of the stories making the actual connections more troubling to put together than they are worth.  With another set of characters that might not have been an issue, but because so many of these characters are wealthy bi-sexual males I had trouble distinguishing between them for much of the individual stories.  However, unlike Glamorama, Ellis keeps things moving at an exciting pace and several of the scenes were particularly memorable.

less than zero

5.  Less than Zero

Release Date: 1985

 I was born a year before this book came out, so by the time I got around to reading it I’d already read several books done in the same style (and even several other Bret Easton Ellis books).  The story of a handful of the most shallow characters in literature, it’s iconic and preposterous at the same time.  Clay is on vacation from college and tries to reconnect with his best friend (Julian) and his girlfriend (Blair).  The drug use in this novel is so frequent, the plot could be described as three friends deal with varying level of drug problems in the 1980’s.  The problem is that reducing it to that misses the broader picture that Ellis portrays.  Reading this book is like opening a time capsule and immersing yourself in the contents.  The detachment that the characters express have the effect of numbing you to the tragic outcomes they face, which makes the read feel more real and unique than a similar story would as told by anybody else.  Unfortunately, that can make it a difficult read for many and an unpleasant one at other times for all.  Still, this is well worth checking out and making up your own mind.  (Also, more than any other book of Ellis, the film adaptation of this is awful.  If you’ve seen it, don’t let that sour you on reading this.)

lunar park

4.  Lunar Park

Release Date: 2005

 The Charlie Kauffman entry of the Ellis catalog, Ellis inserts himself into the story and goes down the rabbit hole.  Narrated by Ellis, the famous author of Less than Zero and other books, Ellis juggles personal issues (with exes, drugs and family) while possibly confronting a supernatural one (a killer identifying himself as Patrick Bateman, the lead character of Ellis’s American Psycho).    Reading Lunar Park is greatly enhanced by reading American Psycho beforehand.  Everything about this book works just right, combining what the reader knows or expect to know about the author with how characters would respond to these freak occurrences.  I should say, everything worked just right until the ending which spiraled a bit out of control.  With a fictionalized book about a real person I don’t know what sort of ending would have satisfactorily resolved the mystery and horror of this book, but lackluster ending aside I found this to be highly enjoyable.

 imperial bedrooms

3.  Imperial Bedrooms

Release Date: 2010

 This choice will be controversial.  Taking place 25 years after Less Than Zero, Imperial Bedrooms follows Clay returning to Los Angeles to cast a film.  Much like Lunar Park, there is ambiguity in terms of how much is truth and how much is fiction, with the truth at issue concerning the events in Less Than Zero and their depictions in a popular book and movie.  Delving into dark territory of rape, murder and snuff films, the book takes away all the sentimentality that seems to surround Less Than Zero and reminds the reader of the amoral characters at its center.  For that reason I preferred it to its predecessor, as Ellis seemed upfront about the subject matter he was tackling.  I get that for many readers, this book cheapens Less than Zero or feels like a cash in by Ellis.  While I enjoyed LTZ, I don’t hold it in such high regard that revisiting it bothered me.  When I compare the two novels, I enjoyed this one much more, hence the ranking.

rules of attraction

2.  The Rules of Attraction

Release Date: 1987

 If you have never read Bret Easton Ellis and are looking for a book that encapsulates all his strengths and oddities, look no further and start reading here.  I’m surprised that Ellis hasn’t returned to the shifting perspectives he utilizes in this book in later writings because it’s perfectly executed and provides a very memorable reading experience.  Mainly told through the perspective of three students, Paul a bisexual man who formerly dated Lauren but is now extremely attracted to Sean.  The characters often interact and will recount the same events in previous chapters from vastly different perspective to the point that one or all must be lying about what took place.  Also mixed in are fantastic chapters by other narrators including the world’s fastest trip to Europe and a very moving suicide.  (Less successful is another section of the book entirely in French.)  Along with my number one pick, this book features frequent laughs and disgusting moments intertwined.

 american psycho

1.  American Psycho

Release Date: 1991

 Although I’d recommend The Rules of Attraction to new Ellis readers, I prefer American Psycho as his best work.  However, for many the graphic nature of the writing and the extensive time spent discussing designer name brands and band discographies will immediately turn them off.  While almost every character in a Bret Easton Ellis novel is detached and amoral, taking a deep dive into the mind of a (possible) serial killer during 1980’s corporate America could also be a lot to ask of a new reader unaccustomed to Ellis’s style.  In addition to that, American Psycho (and Ellis in general) also are often accused of being misogynist.  For my perspective, I would agree that Patrick Bateman is very misogynist.  However, he’s also a sociopathic, materialistic psychopathic sadist and the book is just telling a story from his perspective.

 Those are the criticisms with the book.  They don’t mention how perfectly Ellis straddles the line between satire of an entire lifestyle and realistic conversations that take place in that place.  The result is a book filled with very funny moments drawn from the absurdity of that contrast.  Much like the excellent film that was adapted from it, American Psycho is very dark humor.  Scenes of Bateman being normal and fitting in with a crowd are followed nonchalantly by statements about him eating handfuls of sand on the beach following a party.  A coworker getting reservations at a new restaurant is an existential crisis.  The unreliable narrator is used to great effect as entries vary in length and relevance to what is occurring in his life.  Much like Ellis’s writing style, American Psycho is certainly not for everybody.  However, many other it is without a doubt Ellis’s best work.

Rank the Series: John Updike’s Rabbit Angstrom Books

John Updike’s Rabbit series is unusual in the literary world for several reasons.  For starters, it’s a series of books that doesn’t involve any supernatural, magical or militaristic elements.  It’s also very adult material, with probably as much time spent on sexual acts as anything I’ve read (including the awful “50 Shades of Grey”) but described more realistically than you would find in an erotica novel.  Most impressively, the series was written over 41 years and takes place in real time with the characters and current events aging with the author (and readers who originally picked up the series).  The series is to literature what “Savage Dragon” is to comic books or “Boyhood” is to film, an achievement and testament to its creator merely for existing.

 The idea of this series, following the life and death of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom as detailed over generations, was so interesting to me that the quality of the books almost became secondary.  Having now finished the series, I’m glad I read it all chronologically as each of the five installments was essential in understanding who the characters were and why they reacted to situations as they did.  If you are planning on reading this series, there’s no other order you should read it in than “Rabbit, Run” –>  “Rabbit Redux” –> “Rabbit is Rich” –> “Rabbit at Rest” –> “Rabbit Remembered.”  But that’s not very fun to write about, so here are some thoughts on how enjoyable each of the books in the series is, ranked from worst to best:

 Rabbit redux

5.  Rabbit Redux

Release date:  1971

Chronological Order:  Second

 The two easiest choices in ranking this series are best and worst.  I enjoyed every Rabbit book except for this one that takes all of the social strife of its era and tells the ugliest story in the entire series.  Even in later books the events of “Rabbit Redux” are spoken of in disbelief, with plenty of “do you believe the time Harry had that teen girl and her drug dealer move in with him and then _____ happened?”  In addition to general unpleasantness of the story, the book is also bogged down with racial language of the era that will make many readers uncomfortable. I almost quit reading the series after this one, but after finishing the next three books my dislike for this book is tempered as it became just another crazy memory in the lives of its characters.

 rabbit remembered

4.  Rabbit Remembered

Release Date: 2001

Chronological Order:  Fifth

 This novella is shorter than the rest of the series and also is missing a major focal point from the rest of the series.  Despite that, Updike tells a compelling story about Rabbit’s two surviving children and the people they have grown up to become.  The real world politics and current events that make it into every story resonated the most for me of any book in the series as they were the headlines and pop culture of my youth.  The biggest drawback however is that any ending to this story pales in comparison to the excellent and fitting conclusion to “Rabbit at Rest” in terms of wrapping up the series.

 rabbit

3.  Rabbit is Rich

Release Date:  1981

Chronological Order:  Third

 “Rabbit is Rich” and the second place book on this list are interchangeable in terms of quality.  Here Updike has abandoned the extreme events of “Rabbit Redux” in favor of a much more toned down and relatable storyline.  As Rabbit has finally settled down and reduced the drama in his work and personal life, his son Nelson is now old enough to supply drama enough for both of them.  The ending of this book gets into the most over the top sexual situations in the entire series, so if that’s something that turns you off at the end keep in mind it’s all toned back down after this book.

 Rabbit Run

2.  Rabbit, Run

Release Date: 1960

Chronological Order: First

 A young married man decides to abandon his pregnant wife and young child in favor of the thrill of escape.  I’ll give this book the edge over “Rabbit is Rich” for being the book that established this entire fictional family tree, business and household that have survived so well throughout the series.  Just about everything that happens in the rest of the Rabbit series can be traced to an event in this first book.  At parts heartbreaking and other moments infuriating, Updike does a great job of making unlikable characters interesting and sympathetic.

 rab

1.  Rabbit at Rest

Release Date: 1990

Chronological Order:  Fourth

 The only book in the series I would call a classic on its own, “Rabbit at Rest” is the rare book that delights on every page and even makes you reevaluate earlier books in a more favorable light.  Now a grandparent, Harry’s bad behavior swings more toward curmudgeon and for the first time in the series is even a likable character at times.  However, Harry is also still the same man he’s always been and behaves true to form when given the opportunity.  The family drama provides the most interesting moments in thirty years of history for Harry, Janice and Nelson.  I also can’t speak highly enough about the ending, which provides nostalgia and cyclical storytelling better than just about anything I’ve read.  I loved this book for how it made me reevaluate and love the entire series.

Rank the Series: The Sword of Truth by Terry Goodkind

When I first started the Sword of Truth series, I loved it.  I hadn’t read a lot of fantasy, and as a result I was surprised at the mixture of likable characters and adult drama that filled the pages.  So I continued to read, and Goodkind continued to write, and write and write.  As a completionist, I stuck with them, even though the stories became more and more predictable and repetitive.  For this being a twelve book series (as of this writing), not a lot happened in the later books.  I have spent countless hours reading these massive books, and I can say that not all of those hours have been rewarding.  If I could go back in time and talk to my younger self about my reading habits, the advice I’d give him would be “The Sword of Truth series will disappoint you, more than half of the books are not good and the payoff is only average. Then, when you think you’re finished, he’ll release another book that’s really bad.  If you insist on reading this series, just read the good ones and read recaps of the bad ones.”  I’m sure I wouldn’t have followed my own advice (I’m like Joseph Gordon-Levitt in “Looper” that way), but here’s my breakdown of the books in this series and where the reader should drop off in favor of a recap:

 Wizards_first_rule

1.       Wizard’s First rule –A solid introduction to this world and its characters, one that has unfortunately been damaged by the end of the series.  While Richard and Zedd are faily prototypical heroes of Fantasy, Kahlan’s role as a confessor was unique enough to give make this a plunge worth taking.  After reading “Confessor,” you will realize a lot of what the characters believe in this series are lies and the drama of this book was mostly unnecessary.  But you won’t realize that yet, so I say go ahead and read this one if you’re interested in this series. Overall rank – 3rd out of 12.

       READ IT

Stone_of_Tears

2.      Stone of Tears – More than any other book in the series, Stone of Tears expands the world of the Sword of Truth series and leaves the reader optimistic about the scope of amazing stories Goodkind will surely share with his readers.  The Sisters of the Light and the expansion to Aydindril provided enough change from the previous book to distract from the normal problems that were starting to pop up in the writing. Because it was early in the series, there was less prior material to recap as well.  Overall rank – 2nd out of 12

       READ IT

blood of the fold

3.      Blood of the Fold – At this point in the series, I still enjoyed this book but also realized that Goodkind was fairly limited as a writer. Tons of time is spend recapping prior events and lengthy speeches by characters become more frequent.  Goodkind also spends a great deal of time describing acts of violence against women, more so than in the rest of this series (which still deals with this quite a bit).  Even if the scenes don’t bother you, you’ll realize quickly how often Goodkind uses this as a crutch for generating tension in his plot.  Overall rank – 4thout of 12

       READ IT

Temple_of_the_Winds

4.      Temple of the  Winds – The Hallmarks of what ruins most of this series begin here and are on full display.  The villains are all sadistic clones of each other, prophecy comes up out of nowhere that foreshadows the end of everything and isn’t mentioned again before or after this book, the magic used at the end and reveal of the Temple of the Winds are deus ex machina that completely ignore the rules of magic set out in other books.  Also, the way that Kahlan “betrays” Richard in blood was about as close for me to throwing a book in the garbage as I got in this series.  Overall rank – 6 out of 12 (Yes, that means many of these books are really bad).

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Soul_of_the_Fire

5.      Soul of the Fire – A lot of the same problems as the last book, but this book sets the new tone for the series that every book will follow, namely that no character in the book knows anything about magic.  Wizards and the like such as Zedd, Nicci, the Prelates, Nathan etc. will argue with Richard about what magic can and can’t do.  **Spoiler alert for the series**  Richard is always right, in every book, every time. Despite that, these same experts (his teachers) will doubt him through every book.  Finally Richard will solve the problem through some amazing magic at the end that comes out of nowhere, then be treated as an amateur again at the next book and also forget how to use magic yet again until the ending.  Overall rank – 7 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Faith_of_the_Fallen

6.      Faith of the Fallen – The last good book in the series, and my favorite entry overall.  Look, it’s Goodkind, so it’s not perfect.  This is the preachiest book in the entire series, but the story and characters were all at their most enjoyable.  Throughout the Sword of Truth, with almost zero exceptions the characters are archetypes that don’t change or do anything unpredictable.  In this book, Nicci has an actual character arc and grows as a person.  I’d describe this as Goodkind doing a good Ayn Rand impersonation, so it’s definitely not for everybody but it was well done.  Overall rank – 1 out of 12.

       READ IT

Pillars_of_Creation

7.      The Pillars of Creation – The most forgettable installment in the entire series, that’s actually sort of a compliment at this point.  There was nothing about this one that completely infuriated me, but there were also still tons of pages of recaps and character speeches that did nothing to advance the plot.  This is an entry that could have been skipped altogether and not affected the series.  Overall rank – 9 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, RECAP OPTIONAL

Naked_Empire

8.      Naked Empire – This is a bad book.  I’ll summarize by saying the problems that were in Temple of the Winds, Soul of the Fire and Faith of the Fallen are proudly resurrected for this novel.  What I could do, is recap what all of those problems are and spend ½ of a book talking about those problems and how they were addressed previously instead of actually writing a new story, and fill the other half with definitive statements on how we should view the world and what makes a person good (this style of writing could be called “Goodkinding”) but that wouldn’t be very entertaining, would it?  Overall rank – 10 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Chainfire

9.      Chainfire – The beginning of the END.  Book one of a trilogy to wrap up this meandering series that lost all quality 2 books ago. Surely, stuff starts to happen that is important in this book, and the long recaps are abbreviated?  WRONG.  All of the same problems here, including new magic rules that nobody knows and are quickly broken, more dark prophecy out of nowhere.  Here’s your recap: Richard and Kahlan are separated.  Overall rank 11 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Phantom_SoT

10.  Phantom – We’re getting closer to the end, but still nothing much happens.  This book had probably the least interesting plot of any in this series.  Kahlan and Richard are still separated, but now there’s a blood-beast to contend with.  (A blood-beast is another magic thing that came out of nowhere, that nobody has ever heard of, and is tied into new prophecy).  I’ll rank it higher than “Pillars of creation,” “Naked Empire” or “Chainfire” because the stupid blood-beast was more action than any of the entirety of those go nowhere books.  Overall rank 8 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, READ A RECAP

Confessor

11.  Confessor – The best book since Faith of the Fallen (settle down, the other four books were all… not good).  There’s still tons of recap and preaching, but actual things happen in this book!  There’s an exciting Ja’la match, a trip to the underworld, and the final use of magic rules that come out of nowhere and prophecy that doesn’t make sense (because the series ended!).  The end of the book conveniently tries to fix everything, and really there aren’t many consequences for any characters of interest in this book.  Cara and maybe Zedd have endings that wrap up their story, but the rest of the characters are pretty much where they’ve been since book three in the series.  Overall rank, 5 out of 12.

       READ IT

OmenMachineCover

12.  The Omen Machine – Wait, there’s another book after Confessor?  I’ll start by saying this was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Like Scarlet Witch in Marvel Comics, I had to say outloud when finishing this book “No more Goodkind.”  For starters, early Goodkind was well written even when his poor plots and overly preachiness took over.  The Omen Machine was not even well written.  Much of the fun banter is missing, also gone is the feeling of any gravity to a situation.  Despite being a shorter book it was harder to get through than any other in the series.  The big wrap up that Confessor finally delivered?  The Omen Machine takes place ONE DAY later and goes right back to the same well with a new prophecy that threatens all.  Kahlan in particular is useless in this novel, ignoring all of her prior resourcefulness from the series and requiring Richard to do everything.  This series had a few books I’ll remember fondly, but this last book was so bad and it caps off a string of subpar books that Goodkind’s not getting any more of my time or money.  12 out of 12.

       SKIP IT, DON’T READ A RECAP, PRETEND IT DOESN’T EXIST

 Overall Rankings from Best to Worst:

1.      Faith of the Fallen #6

2.      Stone of Tears #2

3.      Wizard’s First Rule #1

4.      Blood of the Fold #3

5.      Confessor #11

6.      Temple of the Winds #4

7.      Soul of the Fire #5

8.      Phantom #10

9.      The Pillars of Creation #7

10.  Naked Empire #8

11.  Chainfire #9

12.  The Omen Machine #12

 **Note – I read these books before I started reviewing each book I read.  My thanks to the many reviewers who have reviewed the individual books in the series for their assistance in reminding me which order to put the bad books in.**

“Franklin Pierce: New Hampshire’s Favorite Son” by Peter A. Wallner Review

franklin

Franklin Pierce: New Hampshire’s Favorite Son

Author: Peter A. Wallner

Release Date: October 2004

I will do a longer review once I read the second volume of Peter A. Wallner’s Franklin Pierce biography, “Martyr for the Union.” This volume covers Pierce’s early years and heritage and ends at him taking the oath of office in Washington. I’ve read a lot of presidential biographies recently (15 on 14 presidents) and my initial take away was that Wallner does as a good of job as he can with making Pierce interesting and conveying information. The problem is that Pierce didn’t do enough in his early life to justify a two volume study. Whereas somebody like John Quincy Adams had vast accomplishments prior to and after being president, Pierce was relative unknown before being elected. He retired shortly after serving his only term in the Senate, and was strictly a party man while in the House of Representatives. At the state level, for the years leading up to his nomination he was the unofficial head of the Democrat party in New Hampshire, well known among the politicians but not exactly a household name. He was best known for being an attorney, drawing crowds in his area due to his skills with language. By far the most interesting aspects of Pierce was the tragedy in his home life, which I’ll get into more in the full review after volume two.

3-star

“The Long Walk” by Richard Bachman (Stephen King) Review

long.jpg

The Long Walk

Author: Richard Bachman (Stephen King)

Release Date: July 1979

I was nervous when I started “The Long Walk,” mainly because the first “Richard Bachman” book I read was “Rage” and that book was awful, dated, and one of the few books I’ve read that I understood being pulled from book shelves (the book was pulled because it allegedly inspired school shooters, I would have pulled it from shelves because of how bad it was). “The Long Walk” also is about a teenage boy’s struggle facing the death of those around him, so right away my reluctance felt justified. Maybe it was the low expectations but I ended up really enjoying this book for what it was.

The plot of “The Long Walk” is about a contest between 100 boys who begin in Northern Maine and walk south along the road. Each boy wears a monitor that verifies their speed, and any time they fall below 4mph, they get a warning. Each boy gets three warnings before he gets his ticket which means he is out of the race. If they can go a certain amount of time getting a new warning, they can earn back their warnings so they’re back at zero. There’s also a prize at the end of the contest of whatever they want, or anything they want, or everything they want. The contest is ran by an authoritarian military figure known as the Major.

**Stop reading here to avoid spoilers**

As you read the book, you pick up on a few things that are subtle and then some more that are shocking. (At least for me they were, I didn’t read the back of the book so I don’t know how much that spoils.) The world this book takes place in seems to be an alternate reality United States, where after World War II communism is the norm and the Long Walk is the an appealing contest to escape the drudgery, or for other people to take their minds off the bigger issues society is facing. This dystopian future though is not focused on, but only comes across in a few lines of dialogue here and there. I got most of my idea for the world this takes place in from the Walkers own views of their options in life (which was an interesting way to convey the setting by King).

The shocking part happened when the first Walker got his ticket, and soldiers came out and shot him as the other 99 boys kept walking. I figured the twist was something to this extent based on the main character’s mother’s reluctance for him to compete in this event, and some statements at the beginning about how most races have one boy who freezes and gets his ticket right then, but the actual execution by King is fantastic. The nameless soldiers become a force throughout the book, the same as large hills and rain storms that the Walkers acknowledge as part of their reality now.

All that said, the book was by no means perfect. The actual competition didn’t make a ton of sense, with everybody being dropped off by family members shortly before hand in whatever clothes they were wearing and starting out with no fanfare. The motivations for why each walker was in the race were also pretty slim, which the most detailed versions shared being fights with girlfriends or possible homosexuality being revealed to families (I commend King for trying to address homosexuality in this book, leaving it open ended as to the sexuality of two of the main characters, but it’s certainly a product of the era in how it associates shame more than any other emotion with those characters). The struggles with using the restroom and cramping all felt real enough, but the lack of sleep by the Walkers was the one fiction I couldn’t totally suspend my disbelief for.

Equally vague are the rewards people can expect for winning the Long Walk. The ending of the book was both fantastic and disappointing in that King completely succeeds in his goal of telling a lengthy, engaging story about 99 boys walking until they physically can’t continue, and stopping before giving the reader any hint of what happens next. The plot arc in this book is almost entirely internal character growth by Garraty, as he goes from feeling immortal to accepting death as a reality (about ten other characters have the same arc throughout as well). Perhaps it’s the sign of a great book, but selfishly when it was over I found myself asking “would an epilogue have killed you, Stephen?”

4-star