Tag: Deek Rhew

“Birth of an American Gigolo” by Deek Rhew Review

Birth of an American Gigolo

Birth of an American Gigolo

Author: Deek Rhew

Published: 2016

I picked this book up at a convention in Raleigh where we spent some time chatting with the author and his wife (Erin Rhew, also an author). Both were very nice, so we decided to pick up a few of their books. I’m always a fan of people that not only write something for others to read, but go out there and publish it, promote it and try to sell it to the masses. This is a novella, at 111 pages it is a brisk read that you could definitely finish in one sitting. The book is told mainly via third person narrative from the perspective of Lindsey, a woman who learns that her husband has cheated on her. Instead of divorce or even straight forward revenge, Lindsey takes this situation as an opportunity that the reader follows along throughout the rest of the story. The book switches perspectives on two occasions, once to Dios (the handsome Peruvian man that Lindsey utilizes in her new venture) and once to Angel (a grocery store clerk who falls for Dios).

Without spoiling too much, the book features a pretty decent amount of sexuality. Both Lindsey’s immediate reaction and her long term plan all involve handsome younger men. My biggest problem with the book was that although the Rhew spends plenty of time on the sexual education of Dios, he glosses over much more of what could have been more interesting scenes in terms of Lindsey’s meeting with the sheriff, the recruitment of individuals in her binder, or even the special accounting arrangement of quid pro quo services. As a novella, it’s understandable that not everything will be described in detail; however the plot of the novella certainly seemed to offer plenty of opportunities for humorous or suspenseful scenes that Rhew has decided to skip in favor what’s instead present.

The characters in the book are also fairly shallow, with Lindsey and Dios both in the market for using others for their own personal gain, and Lindsey’s husband is fairly oblivious of his own faults. My favorite section of the book was where Angel falls for Dios but I never bought it as a situation that would require Lindsey’s intervention. Despite its faults, the story left me wanting more development and that’s always preferable to one that I’m just hoping for it to end. Rhew has found a story worth telling, based on that I’d try more of his work.

3-star

Advertisements