“The Angel Chronicles: Vol. 2” by Richie Tankersly Cusick Review

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The Angel Chronicles: Vol. 2

Author:  Richie Tankersly Cusick

Published:  1998

My preface from The Angel Chronicles: Vol. 1 stated:

There are a set of Buffy novelizations that are coming up in my reading order that focus on one of the supporting characters in the Scooby gang. Each book selects a few episodes that feature the chosen character prominently and do a novelization of those episodes. The Angel Chronicles is obviously about Angel and featured a two paragraph framing device to the first episode and another one after the final one that didn’t add anything to the story but served to remind the reader that they had indeed just a read of stories about Angel.

Everything above still holds true for this volume about Angel, with the only change being the episodes being revisted. Here there are the episodes “Halloween,” and “What’s My Line” (Parts 1 and 2). Overall this volume was a little bit better than Volume 1 due just to the quality of episodes. “Halloween” is a fun episode where characters turn into whatever they are dressed up as for Halloween, with Xander becoming an experienced soldier, Willow a ghost and Buffy a lady of status from the 1700’s. This episode succeeds as both being a memorable standalone episode and also as an important building piece for the series as a whole. Xander’s military experience gets referred to off and on for the rest of the series, bad guy Ethan Rayne reappears later on (and provides some great depth for Giles past), and of course fan favorite character Oz is introduced.

Likewise, “What’s My Line” is important at pushing the plot forward for the series, but was a little less memorable as standalone episodes. Here, Spike is seeking a way to restore Drucilla’s strength, and comes across a means that involves a new moon, a church and Drucilla’s sire. In order to distract Buffy, he calls for the Order of Taraka to put a hit on her which leads to a variety of assassins who are feared for their relentlessness and anonymity. These episodes are also important to greater Buffy lore as they introduce Kendra the Vampire Slayer, propel Xander and Cordelia’s relationship into its most interesting phase, and swaps the power dynamic from Spike to Drucilla. While reading the novelization, I couldn’t recall where part 1 ended and part 2 began, which is a nice compliment to the seamlessness of the adaptation.

I only rate this slightly better than Vol. 1 however, because I just summed up all three episodes and didn’t need to mention Angel once (ok, that’s a cheat because I said that Drucilla’s sire was needed for the ritual, and her sire is Angel). So basically, his involvement in these two episodes is him being unimpressed by Buffy’s desire to be a noble woman and then getting kidnapped and stabbed by Spike and Drucilla. Those coming for some awesome Angel-centric stories will likely be disappointed. Unlike the last volume, these episodes take place much closer together than Vol. 1’s trilogy, ranging from Season 2 Episode 6 to Season 2 Episode 10 (taking place in between the episodes is “Lie to Me,” which is included in Angel Chronicles Vol. 1… I’m not sure why they didn’t swap out Halloween and Lie to Me between the two, but it is what it is).

My same complaints are also around from the previous volume that this format seems like a missed opportunity to increase the perspective of the cover/title character from the events of these episodes. The three included in this book would seem to be great opportunities to do so, but not for Angel, instead for Xander, Oz or even Cordelia. For a somebody reading all of these books, they succeed in telling the stories from the episodes but the shuffled order and lack of anything new make it tough to recommend these for any other fans of the series.

3-star

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