“Flinx’s Folly” by Alan Dean Foster review

Flinx's Folly

Flinx’s Folly

Author:  Alan Dean Foster

Released:  2002

Unfortunately for Pip & Flinx fans, Alan Dean Foster has fallen into a bad habit of placing the protagonist (and his pet mini-drag) into seemingly deadly situations only to have him rescued by characters that were otherwise absent from the plot of the current story. Following multiple rescues in that manner in Mid-Flinx, and similar instances in Reunion , I was not shocked to see that the same development was utilized in Flinx’s Folly but I was disappointed. That sense of cheating employed by the writer really put a sour finish on what was otherwise a pretty fun adventure.

Rather than visit an alien barren landscape, here Pip & Flinx visit paradise, or the closest planet in the Commonwealth to such a thing. Located in that perfectly habitable distance from the sun and with a favorable tilt resulting in tropical seasons, the setting is as much a vacation for our protagonists as any book in the series. This makes sense as Flinx’s motivation for travel is to visit his most memorable love interest, Clarity Held, the beautiful, intelligent gengineer (genetic engineer) who could write her own ticket for love or career.

The start of Flinx’s Folly has an interesting occurrence where Flinx’s ability causes a mass blackout at a shopping mall, however the plot from there takes on fairly standard adventure tropes. Flinx must flee from a hospital (executed cleverly). Flinx must flee from death worshipping fanaticals (executed less cleverly). The main conflict doesn’t arrive until he locates Clarity (looking for the one person in the Cosmos he feels comfortable opening up to) and her sort of fiancé (whose name I can’t recall, so I’ll just call him Bond Villain).

The most ridiculous and entertaining aspects of Flinx’s Folly all involve Bond Villain’s plans to thwart this interloper from chatting with his lady. He takes the usual steps that us guys need to take to make sure our ladies aren’t being romanced by tall and mysterious foreigners: hiring private investigators and thugs to get dirt or break kneecaps. If that doesn’t work **spoiler alert** sometimes you need to build completely functional android decoys of your fiancé, knife wielding spider robots or set elaborate traps involving gene therapy, but all’s fair in love and sci-fi.

The deus ex machina ending featured two of the best recurring characters from this series, but it’s such a shame that they had to show up in such a plot convenient manner. Taking the Bond analogy further, the final ending of the book left an option for an expanded cast of characters continuing on adventures, but Foster prefers to take our hero to the next installment with no strings attached. (As F. Paul Wilson writes, “a spear has no branches.”) The sect of death worshippers make convenient bad guys that our heroes can kill without remorse, but I don’t find them particularly believable or interesting which puts them in line with the series main antagonist, a massive entity of nothingness accelerating toward our galaxy. Not one of the better entries in the series so far but there were certainly enough ridiculous and fun scenes to make it memorable.

3-star

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: