Month: April 2017

“Doc” by Mary Doria Russell Review

Doc

Doc

Author:  Mary Doria Russell

Release Date:  2011

I’m continuing to review books given glowing recommendations by my favorite Goodreads reviewers. This installment features a recommendation by Kemper who wrote:

“The best read of the year came in the form of two books that made up one historical fiction which added a lot of humanity to legendary figures of the Old West. Doc and Epitaph from Mary Doria Russell were not only entertaining stories but had me thinking a lot about fact vs. fiction when it comes to American myths.”

After finishing Doc I am excited to find and read Epitaph as this was a very well written and engrossing read. I actually knew a lot about Doc Holliday prior to reading this. In addition to having seen a half dozen westerns that portrayed him, I’d read an actual biography about him Doc Holliday: The Life and Legend. As a result I had a pretty good idea of all of the historical details that make up the life of Doc, as well as the lack of resources available to verify the legend.

Before reading this book I was expecting a life story of the famous gunfighter but Russell wisely chooses to tell a story about his lesser known Dodge City days. The benefit of this is that the story can focus on humanizing Doc Holliday, Big Nose Kate and Wyatt & Morgan Earp before they become “famous” individuals. Holliday’s battles in this book involve trying to establish a dental practice, a relationship with Kate and live with consumption. Wyatt Earp’s conflicts center on understanding cowtown politics, adjusting to new teeth and living with a woman. The main plot (which is only loosely a straight forward narrative) is driven by the mystery of the death of a former slave and his missing money.

The use of guns in this book is significantly less than one would expect from the list of characters and setting which makes any moment with action feel much more important by comparison. Again this was a wise choice by Russell as the characters all obviously make it out of Dodge and down to Tombstone, so relying on life and death conflicts would not have had the same stakes as with an all fictional cast. Russell substitutes that action with horse racing, card games and a fist fights, all of which Holliday and the Earps are more vulnerable to.

Much like Bernard Cornwell’s Sharpe books, the nature of this title also allows for some fun historical notes afterward by Russell that provide a Cliff notes biography of Holliday for those not looking to read a whole non-fiction book or wikipedia entry about. There is also a nice table of characters at the beginning to distinguish from the real people with those created for the novel. A cursory glance shows that Russell used her creative liberty to both populate her town with more diversity and create a villain that she could portray as evil without offending any descendants.

My only criticism of this book was a recurring structure of introducing a character with lots of historical background at the beginning of each chapter. For main characters I found this interesting enough but once the story got moving the frequent detours seemed to drag the story more than they provided benefit in the form of context. I generally try to avoid plot spoilers or reading the backs of books ahead of time, so I look forward to finding out who or what exactly Epitaph is about.

4-star

“Guardians of the Galaxy: Rocket Raccoon & Groot Steal the Galaxy” by Dan Abnett Review

Guardians of Galaxy

Guardians of the Galaxy: Rocket Raccoon & Groot Steal the Galaxy

Author: Dan Abnett

Release Date: 2014

This prose novel featuring characters from the Guardians of the Galaxy comics (and tv show, and movie, etc.) is written by Dan Abnett, one half of the writing team that revamped the team’s lineup and has led to some obscure characters becoming as recognizable as the X-Men. Back when he (and Andy Lanning) first released those Guardians of the Galaxy comics, my wife and I got so hooked on them they quickly became our favorite characters. Along with Groot and Rocket Racoon, Star Lord, Drax, Gamora, Bug, Cosmo, Mantis and plenty of others were totally unique in the Marvel cosmic landscape and in comics in general.

Since that time, a lots happened with our favorite characters. As mentioned, they starred in a huge success of a film, have their own cartoon on Disney, and have been written by various A-List comic writers including Brian Michael Bendis on the most recent run. Groot, Star-Lord, Rocket Racoon, Gamora and even Drax have had their own solo series in addition to the ongoing team book. Abnett and Lanning have stopped writing together (sadly I’ve tried a lot of each of their solo stuff and haven’t enjoyed any of it as much as all of their earlier stuff they wrote together). The result of all of that? The Guardians have had a major drop in quality and the two most obscure characters of the bunch have really been run into the ground for the sake of capitalizing on their new fame.

Yeah, I get it. Complaining about overexposure on obscure Marvel superheroes is kind of like saying “I liked the Backstreet Boys where they were underground,” but anybody who reads comics knows that publishers will take a character that sells and put them in a dozen books until the bottom falls out of the market. What does all of this have to do with this prose novel? Unfortunately, the entire novel felt like a cash grab more than a story that needed (or deserved) to be told.

The plot goes as follows: Rocket and Groot come into contact with a Rigellian space recorder (a robot that records everything, who also serves as the 1st person narrator for the book). The robot is being hunted by Timely, Inc. (basically the Wal-Mart or Amazon of the Galaxy) for its contents which may prove so valuable that along the way others start chasing after it as well. Those include Annihilus, The Badoon, the Kree, a Galadorian Space Knight, The Shiar Empire, Gamora, the Xandarians (Novas, or space police) and just about every Marvel alien race short of the Inhumans. Rocket and Groot don’t know why the robot is so valuable, but they try to hang on to him to save their own skins, make a profit and/or protect their new friends depending on the chapter.

The plot of the book felt like a six issue story arc in the comics, where every few chapters there’s a new alien race or bounty hunter involved in the pursuit, but despite the huge cast of fairly disposable characters the book takes a low stakes cartoony approach where nobody ever feels in danger. The humor is most reminiscent of Skottie Young’s Rocket Racoon series, but without the fun artwork to accompany it the story feels tedious at 350+ pages. Rocket and Groot work best as supporting fun characters than as their own protagonists, and this book really suffers for it until a third guardian shows up to provide some additional plot movement.

The best things going for this book is the humor by Abnett, who routinely puts in pop culture references and adolescent voyeur humor by the narrator that work OK. A list of the top five worst jobs in the Marvel cosmic universe was very well done and showed the potential of a prose setting in a Marvel story.  Jokes about disconcertingly human like hands worked less well, particularly on their 39th landing. I got another of these prose novels recently that takes place in the Marvel Cosmic universe, as apparently it’s a new line of books Marvel it trying. Based on this first outing, I’ll read that one before I purchase any more of these.

2-star

“Sharpe’s Enemy” by Bernard Cornwell Review

Sharpe's_Enemy

Sharpe’s Enemy

Author:  Bernard Cornwell

Release Date: January 1984

Sharpe’s Enemy is the best book yet in the Sharpe series, and considering there have been some excellent earlier stories that’s high praise. Taking place over Christmas of 1812, there are so many memorable elements of this book that it really stands out in the series. **Minor plot spoilers sprinkled throughout, but nothing that will ruin the ending**

For starters Sharpe receives a major promotion early in this book to the rank of Major. The role allows him to command his first full scale battle against a battalion by the end the book, and also have his own Captains that work under him. This also expands the cast in a major way with a few officers that I expect will be recurring, most memorably Sweet William the one eyed Captain who takes out his teeth and removes his eye patch before battle. The other major addition is a rocket troop. Part of Sharpe’s responsibilities include the task of testing the rockets and seeing if they are fit for use in battle. The use of the rockets provide two of the most memorable scenes in the book.

The Enemy in the title of the book refers to a certain evildoer from earlier novels, but what makes this installment of the series stand out even more is the presence of numerous individuals that could be called Sharpe’s enemy. Sharpe is tasked with rescuing hostages from a ragtag group of soldiers deserted from French, Spanish, English and Portugese armies. Along the way Sharpe is forced into confrontations of various levels against a superior officer (Lord Farthingdale), a French commander (Colonel Dubreton), a French intelligence officer (Ducos), and of course the evil individual from Sharpe’s past. Although most of the confrontation is with that last individual, my favorite parts of this book all involved Colonel Dubreton. Unlike most villains in the series, Dubreton is a respectable French officer who admires Sharpe and seeks to best him on a battlefield under the rules of conduct. I am hopeful he reappears in later installments.

Sharpe’s love life also is front in center in Sharpe’s Enemy, as both his wife Teresa as well as former lover Josephina are present. In addition to the major promotion, growth in the cast of the book and interesting plot, Sharpe’s Enemy also features the death of two major characters in very dramatic fashion that will certainly have repercussions on Sharpe in the future. For as much as I enjoyed this book however, I would probably not recommend it as a good starting point in the series as part of what made it work so well was how it took storylines from earlier books and concluded them in a satisfying manner.

As with most Sharpe novels there is an historical note at the end of the book that discusses the accuracy of the events described. As usual this was one of the best parts of the book as it told of an actual group of deserters let by a former French army cook. The reveal for what actually happened to that group in real life was a funny moment of creative liberty taken by Cornwell.

5-star

Rank the Author: Bret Easton Ellis

Making his debut at age 21 with the dark and twisted “Less Than Zero,” Bret Easton Ellis is one of the few authors to achieve both celebrity level fame and vitriol in equal levels throughout his career.  For many, his stories are written simply to shock and titillate from a misogynistic viewpoint.  For others he is the master of populating the page with terrible human beings that draw the reader into their sordid affairs.  As part of the literary brat pack (with Tama Janowitz and Jay McInerney), Ellis is also often linked to Generation Xers and his more contemporary works have suffered comparatively by most critical measures.

 When deciding how to read Ellis’s bibliography, part of the fun is in the use of shared characters and settings mainly by reference.  Much like Stephen King and his small towns in Maine, characters in Ellis’s work often know about events from other books or interact with characters from Ellis’s (and even other authors) earlier novels.  For that reason, a fun way to read his works is chronological order, starting with Less than Zero, The Rules of Attraction, American Psycho, Glamorama, and Imperial Bedrooms.  The Informers and Lunar Park don’t take place in the same reality as those books, so if you are going this route I would read The Informers first and end things with Lunar Park.  If you are not interested in diving into the entirety of Ellis’s catalog, here’s how I would rank his books overall, from worst to best:

 Glamorama

7.  Glamorama

Release Date: 1998

 I would describe the plot of this book as Zoolander in the style of Guy Ritchie.  Models being used as killers with numerous identity deceptions and possible double identities… even trying to recall the plot is a recipe for a headache.  The biggest problems with the book are that the beginning takes a long time to get to the plot of the book, that plot is completely outlandish, and then Ellis never seems to be willing to wrap it up.  Even hardcore fans of the author seem to agree that at 500 pages the story meanders.  Recurring metaphors don’t really work either as they are drowned out by lengthy descriptions of drug use and ménage a trios.  My only enjoyment in reading it was the numerous ties it had to other Ellis works, none of which were worth the time spent getting through this disappointing book.

the informers

6 . The Informers

Release Date: 1994

 The only other book by Brett Easton Ellis that I would describe as skippable, even for fans of his writing style.  The Informers is a collection of short stories that are seemingly unconnected (though not totally) that often withholds the name of the narrator of the stories making the actual connections more troubling to put together than they are worth.  With another set of characters that might not have been an issue, but because so many of these characters are wealthy bi-sexual males I had trouble distinguishing between them for much of the individual stories.  However, unlike Glamorama, Ellis keeps things moving at an exciting pace and several of the scenes were particularly memorable.

less than zero

5.  Less than Zero

Release Date: 1985

 I was born a year before this book came out, so by the time I got around to reading it I’d already read several books done in the same style (and even several other Bret Easton Ellis books).  The story of a handful of the most shallow characters in literature, it’s iconic and preposterous at the same time.  Clay is on vacation from college and tries to reconnect with his best friend (Julian) and his girlfriend (Blair).  The drug use in this novel is so frequent, the plot could be described as three friends deal with varying level of drug problems in the 1980’s.  The problem is that reducing it to that misses the broader picture that Ellis portrays.  Reading this book is like opening a time capsule and immersing yourself in the contents.  The detachment that the characters express have the effect of numbing you to the tragic outcomes they face, which makes the read feel more real and unique than a similar story would as told by anybody else.  Unfortunately, that can make it a difficult read for many and an unpleasant one at other times for all.  Still, this is well worth checking out and making up your own mind.  (Also, more than any other book of Ellis, the film adaptation of this is awful.  If you’ve seen it, don’t let that sour you on reading this.)

lunar park

4.  Lunar Park

Release Date: 2005

 The Charlie Kauffman entry of the Ellis catalog, Ellis inserts himself into the story and goes down the rabbit hole.  Narrated by Ellis, the famous author of Less than Zero and other books, Ellis juggles personal issues (with exes, drugs and family) while possibly confronting a supernatural one (a killer identifying himself as Patrick Bateman, the lead character of Ellis’s American Psycho).    Reading Lunar Park is greatly enhanced by reading American Psycho beforehand.  Everything about this book works just right, combining what the reader knows or expect to know about the author with how characters would respond to these freak occurrences.  I should say, everything worked just right until the ending which spiraled a bit out of control.  With a fictionalized book about a real person I don’t know what sort of ending would have satisfactorily resolved the mystery and horror of this book, but lackluster ending aside I found this to be highly enjoyable.

 imperial bedrooms

3.  Imperial Bedrooms

Release Date: 2010

 This choice will be controversial.  Taking place 25 years after Less Than Zero, Imperial Bedrooms follows Clay returning to Los Angeles to cast a film.  Much like Lunar Park, there is ambiguity in terms of how much is truth and how much is fiction, with the truth at issue concerning the events in Less Than Zero and their depictions in a popular book and movie.  Delving into dark territory of rape, murder and snuff films, the book takes away all the sentimentality that seems to surround Less Than Zero and reminds the reader of the amoral characters at its center.  For that reason I preferred it to its predecessor, as Ellis seemed upfront about the subject matter he was tackling.  I get that for many readers, this book cheapens Less than Zero or feels like a cash in by Ellis.  While I enjoyed LTZ, I don’t hold it in such high regard that revisiting it bothered me.  When I compare the two novels, I enjoyed this one much more, hence the ranking.

rules of attraction

2.  The Rules of Attraction

Release Date: 1987

 If you have never read Bret Easton Ellis and are looking for a book that encapsulates all his strengths and oddities, look no further and start reading here.  I’m surprised that Ellis hasn’t returned to the shifting perspectives he utilizes in this book in later writings because it’s perfectly executed and provides a very memorable reading experience.  Mainly told through the perspective of three students, Paul a bisexual man who formerly dated Lauren but is now extremely attracted to Sean.  The characters often interact and will recount the same events in previous chapters from vastly different perspective to the point that one or all must be lying about what took place.  Also mixed in are fantastic chapters by other narrators including the world’s fastest trip to Europe and a very moving suicide.  (Less successful is another section of the book entirely in French.)  Along with my number one pick, this book features frequent laughs and disgusting moments intertwined.

 american psycho

1.  American Psycho

Release Date: 1991

 Although I’d recommend The Rules of Attraction to new Ellis readers, I prefer American Psycho as his best work.  However, for many the graphic nature of the writing and the extensive time spent discussing designer name brands and band discographies will immediately turn them off.  While almost every character in a Bret Easton Ellis novel is detached and amoral, taking a deep dive into the mind of a (possible) serial killer during 1980’s corporate America could also be a lot to ask of a new reader unaccustomed to Ellis’s style.  In addition to that, American Psycho (and Ellis in general) also are often accused of being misogynist.  For my perspective, I would agree that Patrick Bateman is very misogynist.  However, he’s also a sociopathic, materialistic psychopathic sadist and the book is just telling a story from his perspective.

 Those are the criticisms with the book.  They don’t mention how perfectly Ellis straddles the line between satire of an entire lifestyle and realistic conversations that take place in that place.  The result is a book filled with very funny moments drawn from the absurdity of that contrast.  Much like the excellent film that was adapted from it, American Psycho is very dark humor.  Scenes of Bateman being normal and fitting in with a crowd are followed nonchalantly by statements about him eating handfuls of sand on the beach following a party.  A coworker getting reservations at a new restaurant is an existential crisis.  The unreliable narrator is used to great effect as entries vary in length and relevance to what is occurring in his life.  Much like Ellis’s writing style, American Psycho is certainly not for everybody.  However, many other it is without a doubt Ellis’s best work.

“Colony” by Melinda Metz and Laura J. Burns Review

Colony

Author: Melinda Metz and Laura J. Burns

Release Date: 2005

Colony

The first season of Buffy features some ridiculous storylines and villains, including an episode (“Teacher’s Pet”) where Xander’s teacher is a beautiful woman who is actually a praying mantis looking to eat her mates.  Colony takes place during season two of Buffy and features a very similar villain although with the added danger of mind control (similar to the episode “Bad Eggs”).  With a plot reminiscent of two actual episodes, one would expect that this book nails the overall feel of the early episodes of the season.  There were a few issues that keep that from being the case, starting with that recurring Buffy novelization problem of visions by the protagonist.  One gets the feeling that a lot of these writers rewatched the movie before writing their books as Buffy’s dreams are constantly referenced in the books whereas they were totally disregarded in the show.  The other biggest problem in this book was Buffy’s slow reaction to the danger her friends were in.

In Colony, the school is visited by a guest speaker who is actually an Ant Queen whose goal is to reproduce and build an Ant Colony.  Buffy sees many of her friends and Watcher under mind control, and even suffering from body horror out of Cronenberg (Xander develops a giant thorax, other characters develop Ant mouths) but routinely takes no action or doesn’t acknowledge the seriousness of the situation.  It’s difficult to criticize a book with a ridiculous plot (and a giant demon that resembles the Lucky Charms Leprechaun) for not taking things seriously enough, but the characters treating the situation as not serious removed any tension from this book.

This is a Stake Your Destiny book where the reader makes choices and tries to navigate through to a happy ending.  In that regard this book did a better job that either of the previous two installments (although I preferred the story more in The Suicide King).  The choices offered to the character were more in line with actual paths Buffy might take in the show, and I made it through with only one wrong choice.  My one wrong choice involved whether Buffy should ask Xander about what was going on with him or go patrolling and look for Angel.  It was one of those situations where Buffy made a few other decisions after the one I made which ended up killing her but overall it didn’t feel completely unfair.  This book also didn’t have the same problem as Keep Me in Mind where the choices were obvious based on page numberings which one you should pick.  Here I jumped back and forth across the book and reached the end so if there was a more direct path through it I missed out on it.

The cleverest part of this book involved the purpose of the personality test that the students were all required to take (determining what role they’d have in the ant colony).  The twist felt like a well thought out reason for the villain assuming the identity that she was posing under.  I still have another Stake Your Destiny to go and am hoping for one that feels accurate to the series and offers realistic choices laid out in a non-predictable manner.  So far each of these books has been lacking in at least one of those areas, but I am still enjoying the general idea of reading these and navigating my own way through a Buffy episode.

3-star

Roadwork by Stephen King (as Richard Bachman) Review

Roadwork

Author: Stephen King (as Richard Bachman)

Release Date: 1981

Roadwrk1

Warning, this is one of those books I can’t complain about without also spoiling the ending.  Spoilers marked accordingly below.

 I had a feeling of déjà vu while reading Roadwork by Stephen King (as Richard Bachman).  Following on the heels of The Rage, The Shining and even The Long Walk, King has now told multiple books about seemingly sane characters snapping and losing all appreciation for right or wrong, life or death.  In this story, Barton George Dawes is forced to come to grips with a highway expansion that will require him to sell his home and relocate his employer.  From the beginning of the story it’s clear that Dawes is lying either to himself or to everybody else.  After buying some powerful firearms, he concocts a story that will cause the laundry corporation that he works for to miss out on the new property that it has an option on. The result will force the company to go out of business, but have little practical effect on the corporation that owns it.

 If that sounds like a stupid plan, it’s because it is.  Similarly to the main character in (the terrible) The Rage, here the protagonist frequently makes decisions that will cause hardships on other characters with no care for that effect on their situation.  Whereas the shooter in The Rage actually killed people, Dawes actions are more in line with ruining his wife’s and coworkers’ finances.  (There is a ridiculous statement about his coworkers having unemployment coverage that will take care of them better than the laundry ever could, but it only underscores how little Dawes cares for these people or understands their situations.)  As the book progresses, Dawes tries to simultaneously thwart the city’s highway expansion, while also weigh the moral implications of his actions.

 I’m starting to pick up on a trend that the Bachman books are supposed to be bleak.  Through the first three, only The Long Walk has been what could be described as an enjoyable read.  However the problem is not in the dark subject matter of the stories but instead in the execution.  **Spoilers follow for the ending of the book**  Dawes solution at the end is to blow up his house (with him in it) before a televised news crew.  The way he makes sure a news crew is present is to shoot at the lawyer and police officers he told could come take possession of his house when they arrive.  This book takes place in the 1970’s, so I think calling in a tip to the news station could have had the same desired outcome.  Although it doesn’t appear he kills any of civil servants, he shoots at least one in the arm with a Magnum (the book points out repeatedly how powerful the firearms he has chosen are).  Apparently we are to overlook or empathize with Dawes because he lost a child several years back.

 This book may have been a better read if told through the perspective of Mary (Dawes wife) or if he actually spent any time sympathizing with her.  While they both lost a son, Mary’s pain is overlooked because of how much their son was “George’s boy.”  When she loses everything and is forced to move in with her parents, Dawes solution is to split the money he received for surrendering the house with her as well as their bank account, and then give the rest to a hitchhiker he slept with shortly after they split up.  It is obvious King wants readers to either sympathize with Dawes or forgive some of his actions, but he never gives reasons to do so.  If his intent was to just tell a story about a selfish man who decides to kill himself, then he should have made it more entertaining than what is present in Roadwork.  In various introductions to the Bachman books, King expresses disappointment in this story but says it gives readers a window into his mind at the time of publication and later calls it his favorite Bachman book.  Although both statements can be true, I would only concur with his initial evaluation.

 The only positives I can say about this book involve a few entertaining scenes that had me optimistic King’s story would develop into something better.  Early on when Dawes is coming up with stories to fool a gun seller (for no real reason) and later Dawes’s supervisor (in order to make them lose their option on the property), I was eager to find out what the end game he had in mind was.  Instead for 300+ pages, Dawes has no idea what he is going to do and we are dragged along.  This included numerous pages of Dawes moping around his house and a trip on mescaline that seemed out of place with the rest of the book.  While I’m only giving this one star, I will say that on the scale of one star books this is much closer to two stars than zero stars (which Goodreads doesn’t allow) and was much better than The Rage.

1-star

“Nevertheless: A Memoir” by Alec Baldwin Review

Nevertheless: A Memoir

Author: Alec Baldwin

Release Date: 2017

NeverthelessWho would want to read a book about a guy that needs to spend two pages detailing all of the people he’s punched since becoming famous? Somebody whose most famous moment in the past twenty years involved leaving a voicemail insulting his young daughter? Somebody whose politics can be so one sided he was caricatured as the villain in Team America: World Police? Sign me up, for starters. In addition to plenty of controversy and poor decisions, Baldwin is also the fascinating Hollywood leading man who famously could not draw an audience. Despite all that, he has appeared in many great films, had a starring role in one of the best TV comedies of all time, hosted Saturday Night Live more than any other person and enjoyed a second career as a successful podcaster. Clearly there is ample substance here to populate an autobiography.

Much like the man writing it, Nevertheless: A Memoir by Alec Baldwin is at times very entertaining and at others frustrating. I suspect your enjoyment of this book will depend on your expectations heading into it. If you are looking for an extensive experience inside the mind of Alec Baldwin spent discussing his famous family, behind the scenes drama on movie sets and his aspirations beyond acting you’ll unfortunately be disappointed. Although there are nuggets of each of those areas, Nevertheless doesn’t spend an extensive amount of time on any of them. If you are hoping for a very well written summary of his life that touches on all of the greatest hits but does not go into great detail on any of them, then this is a very engrossing read and a page turner.

The early headlines coming from this book involve the shade thrown by Baldwin at the producers of a movie that possibly misled him on his co-star being underaged and at Harrison Ford for taking his Jack Ryan franchise away from him. Those two sections combined take up two paragraphs in a 260 page memoir. Comparatively, Baldwin spends extensive time complimenting the many actors, directors, agents and friends he has known throughout his life. It is fitting that Nevertheless’s headlines look to make Baldwin as combative and ignore sections praising the likes of Gary Oldman, Jennifer Jason Leigh or Al Pacino. Even when describing his relationship with Kim Basinger, Baldwin’s harshest words are reserved for the attorneys and judges that he has encountered in his various trips to the court room.

While Baldwin spends an appropriate amount of time discussing 30 Rock, The Hunt for Red October, The Edge and his work in the theater, the vast majority of his filmography receives one sentence or fewer. For me, that was the most disappointing aspect of this book as Baldwin is primarily known for being an actor but glosses over most of his film work. Similarly, Baldwin spends a great deal of time discussing his parents but almost no time at all on his famous siblings (what little is mentioned is when all of the boys were still living at home). The one family member that gets extensive discussion outside of his parents is his daughter Ireland. While I don’t disbelieve anything Baldwin writes regarding his daughter, each passage does read like atonement bordering on pandering to convince the reader that the voicemail controversy was not indicative of their relationship. Baldwin also details his relationship and affection for homosexual males throughout his life which similarly reads as laying the groundwork for his rebuttal toward criticism of his use of the word “faggot” toward a paparazzi (Baldwin also denies saying that word).

Those are my criticisms of the book but I’m giving it four stars. I read this book over a few days but it’s definitely the sort of book you could read through in one sitting. Baldwin writes more like a novelist than an actor, utilizing different tenses and twists in chronology to tell his life story. The language is excellent to the point that I was checking for a ghost writer after completing. My favorite section was actually the flashback through all the people Baldwin had punched which served as a shocking and entertaining switch from the reality Baldwin had presented throughout the rest of the book. While I didn’t learn a lot about his work on his own projects that I didn’t already know, Baldwin is proud to share his knowledge of film history (and classical music) in a way that is likely to educate many readers. Despite obviously writing to counter personal attacks on him as a parent and homophobe, Baldwin also comes away looking very honest at other times, such as discussing his motivations for writing this book and his belief that parents can never love all their children equally.

One gets the sense that Baldwin is just beginning another chapter of his life with three children under three as he approaches sixty years old. For older fans, he is a former leading man but a new generation sees him as a game show host and a late night impressionist.Nevertheless is the second book he has written, but looking at where he is now in life Baldwin has ample life experiences happening to supply a third one. If you are a fan of his work or just find him an interesting public figure, this book will entertain you. If you are looking for more than what you could get in an extended interview with the man, particularly related to his film work and famous siblings you may come away disappointed.

4-star